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The '50s was the decade of power and the numbers put up by the untainted athletes were impressive.
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INSIDE:

CLUBHOUSE
CRONICLES

Jimmy Palermo, during a historic 7-day span in May, 1939, saw the meteoric rise of Williams and tragic decline of Gehrig.

THE GAME'S
GOLDEN ERA

An exclusive WIWAG ongoing feature.


MEMORIES
The field seemed vast to a 7-year old who had looked forward to this day for two months.

BREAKING THE COLOR LINE
The year marks the 60th anniversary of the first major league tryout for black players.

SPECIAL COLOR
LINE TIMELINE

Bud Fowler is the first know black players on an integrated team.

BOOMING BATS
of the '50s

Qualify as Grade A10.


AMERICA'S ORIGINAL
SPORTS BAR
First sports bar featured 12-inch Farnsworth TV.

BASEBALL
HISTORIANS

Two unsuspecting vintage baseball fans rediscover a "National Treasure."
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THIS BAT, a Louisville Slugger (model M159) with "MUSIAL MODEL" block stamped on the barrel was brought over to

Jimmy Palermo, proprietor of the Original Sports Bar by batboy Freddie Buchholz immediately after the Sunday double-header, and is the only uncracked bat in the Booming Bats of the 50s Commemorative Collection.










STAN MUSIAL: THE ANATOMY OF A MAJOR LEAGUE RECORD-SETTING PERFORMANCE


“STAN THE MAN” MUSIAL, considered the greatest St. Louis Cardinal and one of the greatest hitters of all time, used the bat pictured above and at left, in a double-header against the Giants on May 2, 1954 when he hit a record five home runs at Busch Stadium.

STAN MUSIAL displays the tools he used to set a Major League record five home runs and 21 total bases in a double-header on May 2, 1954. Stan's record still stands today.

IN THE FIRST GAME of that historic Sunday, Stan went 4 for 4.

— HOME RUN NO. 1: Stan planted a long fly on to the right field pavilion roof against Johnny Antonelli in the third inning.

— HOME RUN NO. 2: This blast was also courtesy of Antonelli in the fifth inning, which landed on the pavilion roof in right field.

— HOME RUN NO. 3: Stan hit a Jim Hearn slider that barely made the edge of the pavilion roof to tie the game 6-6 in the eighth inning. Stan finished the opener with six RBIs in the 10 - 6 Cardinal win.

IN THE SECOND GAME, most of which was played under the Busch Stadium lights, Stan walked his first time up, then drilled a long drive to center that Willie Mays tracked down at the 410 ft. mark the second time up.

— HOME RUN NO. 4: In the fifth inning, Musial hit a slow curve off of future Hall of Famer Hoyt Wilhelm over the right field pavilion roof and onto Grand Avenue.

— HOME RUN NO. 5: Stan deposited another souvenir over the pavilion roof onto Grand Avenue off of Whilhelm in the seventh inning.

Musial finished the second game, a 9-7 loss to the New Yorkers, with three more RBIs and a total base tally of 21 for the day. No one before, or since, has hit five circuit-clouts in a double-header. The following night against the Giants he walked four times (one intentional) and popped up.

In 1954, Stan finished the year with 35 home runs, 126 RBIs, 195 hits and an average of .330.

STAN MUSIAL

HALL OF FAME: 1969

ALL-STAR:1943, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954
1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963.

NATIONAL LEAGUE MOST VALUABLE PLAYER: 1943, 1946, 1948.

Musial held 29 National League records, 17 Major League records and 9 All-Star records

Slugging Cardinal topped the .300 mark 17 times and won seven National League batting titles with his famed corkscrew stance and ringing line drives

HALL OF FAMER

STAN MUSIAL is among the greatest hitters in Major League history.
STAN MUSIAL WEB LINKS

Stan Musial was one of the greatest players in the history of baseball. Though he began his professional career as a pitcher, Musial was ultimately known for his bat.

In Musial's first four full major league seasons, the Cardinals captured four pennants and three World Championships. Although the Cardinals failed to win another title during his career, Musial went on to become one of the game's greatest and most beloved players. He was and still is a St. Louis icon.

He won seven batting championships, three MVP Awards, and surpassed the 3,000 hit milestone.

A gentleman both on the field and off, "Stan the Man" Musial began his Major League career on September 17, 1941 with the St. Louis Cardinals. Musial played for 22 seasons, all in St. Louis, and ended his big league playing career in 1963.

The dead-armed Class C pitcher became a slugging outfielder who topped the .300 mark 17 times and won seven National League batting titles with his famed corkscrew stance and ringing line drives. He also played in 24 all-star games — a record he shares with Willie Mays.


The left handed hitting Musial had good speed and was famous for his compressed, closed batting crouch, from which he appeared to be peering at the pitcher around a corner. He won his first National League batting title in his second full year. In addition to leading the league in hits six times, he lead the senior curcuit in doubles eight times, triples five times and runs five times.

Stan had a .331 lifetime average, with 3,630 hits, 475 home runs and 1,951 RBIs. Although not initially expected to be a long-ball hitter, Musial developed his power without increasing strikeouts, and averaged 31 home runs per season from 1948 to 1957. When he retired, Musial owned or shared a whopping 29 National League records, 17 Major League records, nine all-star records — including most home runs (6), and almost every Cardinals career offensive record.

STAN "THE MAN" had a .331 lifetime average, with 3,630 hits, 475 home runs and 1,951 RBIs.

In 1956 The Sporting News named Musial its first Player of the Decade. For one who played so long, Musial was unbelievably consistent. He smacked 1,815 hits at home and the same number on the road. He scored 1,949 runs and drove in 1,951. He batted .310 or better 16 straight seasons and added a .330 season just short of his 42nd birthday.

Over 21 full seasons he averaged a remarkable 172 hits, 92 runs scored, 92 RBIs, 34 doubles and 23 home runs per year. His best offensive season was 1948, when he hit a career-high .376 and missed the National League Triple Crown by a single homer.

On May 2, 1954, he set a Major League record with five home runs in a doubleheader. When asked on Monday, the following day after the feat, by the curator of the Hall of Fame museum if he could spare the bat for the Hall he used to hit the five home runs, Stan was quoted in the Sporting News as saying, "Sure. I got a lot of bats!"

MUSIAL WON SEVEN batting championships and three MVP awards during his 22-year career.

During Musial's incredible career with the Cardinals 1941 - 1963, he played in 3,026 games; had 10,972 at bats; 6,134 total bases; lead the National League in total bases and slugging percentage six years; won seven National League batting titles; was the league's Most Valuable Player in 1943, 1946 and 1948; and was named to 24 all-star teams.


Stan "The Man" was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969 with 94 percent of the vote.

Longtime baseball broadcaster Vin Scully summed up Musial's career by saying, "How good was Stan Musial? He was good enough to take your breath away."

STAN MUSIAL: Did you know...

...Musial was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals before the 1938 season as an amateur free agent.

...Musial's first four full major league seasons, the Cardinals captured four pennants and three World Championships.

...Musial was nicknamed Stan "The Man" by Dodger fans for the havoc he wrought at Ebbets Field — and is still renowned for his skilled harmonica playing.

...Musial, on May 2, 1954, hit a record five home runs in a doubleheader against the Giants, including two round-trippers off future Hall of Fame pitcher Hoyt Wilhelm.

...Musial was selected the Sporting News Major League Player of the Year in 1946 and 1951. Sports Illustrated named him its Sportsman of the Year in 1957, and the Sporting News honored him as Sportsman of the Decade for the years between 1946 and 1956.

...Musial led the National League in total bases and slugging percentage six times.

...Musial won seven National League batting titles.

...Musial was the National League Most Valuable Player in 1943, 1946 and 1948.

...Musial said, "When a pitcher's throwing a spitball, don't worry and don't complain — just hit the dry side like I do."

...Musial was selected to the National League all-star team 24 times.

...Musial, upon retirement, held 17 major league, 29 National League and 9 all-star game records.

...Musial was born November 21, 1920, Donora, Pennsylvania.


SPORTS ILLUSTRATED named Stan its Sportsman of the Year in 1957.

MUSIAL PLAYED in 24 all-star games — a record he shares with Willie Mays.

OVER 21 FULL SEASONS Musial averaged a remarkable 172 hits, 92 runs scored, 92 RBIs, 34 doubles and 23 home runs per year.

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS: Stan's demeanor and professionalism made him a respected personality not only with baseball fans, but with the general public as well.

TOOLS OF THE TRADE: Stan on his way to work during spring training in St. Petersburg, Florida.

THE PERFECT SWING: Musial is famous for his compressed, closed batting crouch, from which he appeared to be peering at the pitcher around a corner.

CLASS ACT: Not only was Musial one of the greatest Major Leaguers ever, he was also one of the best ambassadors the game has ever seen. Stan "The Man" was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969 with 94 percent of the vote.